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West Virginia University

Faculty, Staff, & Program Committee

Bonnie Brown, M.A.

Native American Studies Program Coordinator
Teaching Instructor, Native American Studies
Eberly College of Arts and Sciences


Bonnie M. Brown

Contact Information:
Office: 207 Knapp Hall
PO Box 6284
Morgantown, WV 26506-6284
Phone: 304-293-4626
Fax: 304-293-3041
BonnieM.Brown@mail.wvu.edu



Bonnie Brown joined WVU as an assistant professor of journalism in 1996, but her professional and academic interests in media representations of Native Americans and other ethnic minority groups led her to begin working for the Native American Studies Program in 2001 and being appointed coordinator in 2005. She teaches Introduction to Native American Studies and has developed courses on Contemporary Native American Issues, Native Women in Leadership, Sovereign Tribal Nations, Native Leaders in Action, Black Indians, and a seminar with Walter Echo-Hawk (Pawnee Nation) called “Courts of the Conqueror” (based on his recent book, In the Courts of the Conqueror: The Ten Worst Indian Law Cases Ever Decided).


Leilani Browning, Ed.D. ABD

Lecturer, Native American Studies
Eberly College of Arts and Sciences


NAS

Contact Information (via NAS):
Office: 207 Knapp Hall
PO Box 6284
Morgantown, WV 26506-6284
Phone: 304-293-4626
Fax: 304-293-3014





Of Native Hawaiian descent, Ms. Browning developed and co-taught, with Thomas Keopuhiwa, “Native Hawaiian Culture and History.” She served WVU as a graduate assistant in the McNair Scholars Program.


Tyler Boulware, Ph.D.

NAS Program Committee
Associate Professor of History
Eberly College of Arts & Sciences



Dr. Boulware gave a public reading for NAS in 2012

Contact Information:
Department of History
PO Box 6303
G3 Woodburn Hall
Morgantown , WV 26506
Phone: 304-293-9306
Tyler.Boulware@mail.wvu.edu




Much of Dr. Boulware’s teaching and research in early American history deals with Native Americans, empires, and encounters. He structures both his undergraduate and graduate courses to situate indigenous peoples at the center of colonial American history. His book, Deconstructing the Cherokee Nation: Town, Region, and Nation among Eighteenth-Century Cherokees (Gainesville: University Press of Florida, 2011), explores the localism and regionalism of Cherokee political life while also detailing Cherokee nation-building efforts during the eighteenth century. Dr. Boulware’s next book project is currently titled Next to Kin: Native Americans and Friendship in Early America. This manuscript reveals how Native American understandings of friendship helped to solidify personal relationships and inter-group alliances throughout North America, and how these ideas about friendship and its obligations also contributed to the violence that erupted between individuals and communities.

About Dr. Boulware’s book



Joe Candillo, Ph.D.

Member, Pascua Yaqui Indian Tribe of Arizona

Lecturer, Native American Studies
Eberly College of Arts and Sciences
and
Lecturer, Division of Forestry and Natural Resources, Davis College of Agriculture, Natural Resources, and Design



Joe Candillo

Contact Information:

Joecandillo.com




“I see teaching as one of the most important positions one can ever hold in life. As a Native American I especially appreciate the opportunity to teach about Native Americans. From this emic perspective I share the knowledge I have gained through living my life as an Indigenous person. As a traditionally-minded Yaqui Indian, I honor tribal elders as the true experts in the field of Native American Studies. I have learned the most about Native America from these elders. It is from this platform that I create class lectures which engage students on both a professional and personal level. I consider the process of learning to be a part of the sacred. Being given the opportunity to share my stories and my insights as a Native American is truly a blessing and I am honored by it. The world I know as a traditionally-minded Indigenous person is full of magic, synergy, and beauty. As a teacher I always try my best to give each one of my students a deeper understanding of the world I have come to know.” Mr. Candillo was a panelist for the NAS-sponsored regional symposium, “Telling the Stories: American Indian Interpretation in the Trans-Allegheny Region.”
Courses taught:
Introduction to Native American Studies
Native American Material Culture
Advanced Native American Material Culture
...and through the WVU Divison of Forestry:
Wilderness Experience – Wilderness Immersion and Traditonal Native American Ecology



Cari Carpenter, Ph.D.

NAS Program Committee
Associate Professor of English
Eberly College of Arts and Sciences



Dr. Cari Carpenter

Contact Information:
PO Box 6296
Morgantown , WV 26506-6296
Phone: 304-293-9709
Cari.Carpenter@mail.wvu.edu



Dr. Carpenter specializes in early Native American women writers and connections between sovereignty, nationalism, and gender. An English professor, Dr. Carpenter teaches Literature of Native America, Native American Women Writers, and Multiethnic Literature. In summer 2009, Dr. Carpenter engaged students in an educational travel experience as part of her Special Topics in Womens Literature class (an Amizade Global Service Learning course taught in Cochabamba, Bolivia).

She published the book Seeing Red: Anger, Sentimentality, and American Indians in 2008 with The Ohio State University Press and has co-edited a forthcoming collection of newspaper articles by and about the Northern Paiute activist and educator Sarah Winnemucca Hopkins. It will be published by the University of Nebraska Press.



Jane Dailey

NAS Program Committee
Student Services Program Assistant
WVU School of Nursing



scan_1

Contact Information:
West Virginia University
PO Box 9640
Morgantown , WV 26506
Phone: 304-293-1386
Fax: 304-293-2784
edailey@hsc.wvu.edu




Of Native American descent, Jane Dailey is part of the staff at WVU. She has served as Advisor to ONAI (The Organization for Native American Interests) and was a workshop instructor in the NAS West Virginia Summer Teacher Institute, “A Crossroads of Native Culture and History: Examining the Native American Heritage of West Virginia and the Region.” She sings with Mother Earth Beat, an all women’s drum, and gave the NAS Sycamore Circle public lecture, “The Heartbeat of Mother Earth: Native American Women on the Drum,” discussing changing attitudes on the emergence of all-women Native drums and her participation in “Balancing the Sacred Hoop,” a series of summer drum feasts held sequentially throughout the country in each of the four sacred directions.



Angela Grabuloff, Ed.D.

NAS Lecturer, Eberly College of Arts and Sciences
Social Studies Faculty, Morgantown High School



Dr. Angela Grabuloff, ice fishing with NAS students and friends on a tributary of the Kuskokwim River near Tuntutuliak, AK.

Contact Information (via NAS):
Office: 207 Knapp Hall
PO Box 6284
Morgantown, WV 26506-6284
Phone: 304-293-4626
Fax: 304-293-3041



Dr. Grabuloff has developed and twice taught, “Yup’ik Culture and History,” a travel immersion course centered in the Alaska Native Village of Tuntutuliak, Alaska. She wrote multiple successful grants in 2012, allowing selected Morgantown High School students to participate in the subsistence lifestyle experience. Dr. Grabuloff has arranged innovative cultural exchange opportunities for local students and Tuntutuliak’s Yup’ik students using SKPE technology. She was a WVU McNair scholar and is a veteran of the U.S. Air Force.




Travis Henline, M.A.

Lecturer, Native American Studies
Eberly College of Arts and Sciences


Travis Henline, NAS Instructor

Contact Information:
Site Manager, West Virginia Independence Hall
1528 Market St.
Wheeling , WV 26003
Phone: 304-238-1300
Travis.L.Henline@wv.gov




“Among the first WVU students to graduate with the Native American Studies minor, my education has proven invaluable in my professional career. I’ve enjoyed teaching Native American subjects to public audiences, working in the National Park Service and for the American Indian Interpretive Program at Colonial Williamsburg Foundation. My exposure to this burgeoning field provided a solid background and ONAI, the Organization for Native American Interests, allowed me the opportunity to produce important on-campus educational events and work with Native people from the region and around the nation.” Mr. Henline’s commitment to accurate, culturally sensitive interpretation of public history continues in his role as site manager at West Virginia Independence Hall, West Virginia Division of Culture and History. He was a panelist for the NAS-sponsored regional symposium, “Telling the Stories: American Indian Interpretation in the Trans-Allegheny Region.”
Courses taught include:
Introduction to Native American Studies
Eastern Woodland Indians
Cherokee History and Culture (taught on site, Qualla Boundary, Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians)


Ellesa Clay High, Ph.D.

NAS Program Committee, former NAS Program Coordinator
Associate Professor of English,
Lecturer, Native American Studies
Eberly College of Arts and Sciences



Ellesa High at 2012 Peace Tree Ceremony.

Contact Information:
229 Colson Hall
PO Box 6296
Morgantown , WV 26506-6296
Phone: 304-293-9722
Fax: 304-293-5380
Ellesa.High@mail.wvu.edu




Ellesa Clay High is a member of the Lower Eastern Ohio Mekoce Shawnee, a non-federally-recognized tribe. She teaches American Indian literature, film, and creative writing. Dr. High is an award-winning writer whose work includes poetry, fiction, and nonfiction, as well as scholarly articles and chapters. Recently, she completed work focused on the indigenous history and cultures of West Virginia:
High, Ellesa Clay. “West Virginia.” Native America: A State-by-State Historical Encyclopedia. Ed. Daniel S. Murphree. 3 vols. Santa Barbara: ABC-CLIO, 2012.


Melanie Hockenberry, M.A.

Lecturer, Native American Studies
Eberly College of Arts and Sciences
and
Lecturer, Child Development & Family Studies Lecturer, College of Education and Human Services


Melanie Hockenberry




Ms. Hockenberry earned her Master of Arts in educational psychology from the Department of Technology, Learning, and Culture from WVU’s College of Education and Human Services. Her thesis is titled, “Validation of the Resilience Competencies Scale (RCS) for Applications among American Indian Youth.” Her research interests include resilience, positive youth development, and culturally sensitive measurement development.

Courses taught:
Introductory-level course on families across the lifespan (CDFS 110)
Introductory-level course on Native American Studies (NAS 200)
Upper-level undergrad seminar on adolescent development (CDFS 412)
Upper-level undergrad seminar on contemporary issues in family studies (CDFS 413)
Upper-level undergrad seminar on communication in families (CDFS 415)



Thomas Keopuhiwa, Ed.D.

Lecturer, Native American Studies
Eberly College of Arts and Sciences


Professor Keopuhiwa introduced his NAS students to Kaua`i Community College Hawaiian Language Instructor Puali'imaikalani Rossi-Fukino

Contact Information:
Thomas.Keopuhiwa@gmail.com




Of Native Hawaiian descent, Thomas Keopuhiwa has developed and taught “Native Hawaii Travel Experience,” a travel immersion course based in Kaua`i, Hawaii; and co-taught, with Leilani Browning, “Native Hawaiian Culture and History.” His research interest focuses on the identity development of minority populations in educational settings. Mr. Keopuhiwa served WVU as a graduate assistant in the McNair Scholars Program. (This photo was taken during Dr. Keopuhiwa’s Native Hawaiian Travel Immersion course in November 2012 as he introduced his NAS students to Kaua`i Community College Hawaiian Language Instructor Puali’imaikalani Rossi-Fukino.)


Karen Manzo, M.P.H., Ph.D. ABD

Lecturer, Native American Studies Program
Eberly College of Arts and Sciences
NAS Program Committee


Karen Manzo

Contact Information:
School of Public Health
West Virginia University
PO Box 9190
Morgantown, WV 26506-9190
Phone: 304-293-8381

Fax: 304-293-8624
kmanzo@hsc.wvu.edu




Ms. Manzo is an evaluator with the Montana-Wyoming Tribal Leaders Councils Planting Seeds of Hope Youth Suicide Prevention Project. Her teaching and professional endeavors center on American Indian Health. She is especially interested in youth suicide prevention and the health effects related to historical trauma. She is completing her doctorate in Public Health Sciences at WVU.

Carol A. Markstrom, Ph.D.

NAS Program Committee, former interim NAS Program Coordinator
Professor, Child Development and Family Studies
College of Education and Human Services



Dr. Carol Markstrom

Contact Information:
Dept. of Technology, Learning, and Culture
506G Allen Hall
PO Box 6122
Morgantown , WV 26506-6122
Phone: 304-293-3344
Fax: 304-293-9424
carol.markstrom@mail.wvu.edu
website address: http://depts.hre.wvu.edu/cmarkstrom/



Carol Markstrom’s interests include: Native American adolescents, women, and families; puberty ceremonies of North American Indians; cultural preservation; environmental concepts and protection of sacred places. She is particularly interested in Apache history and culture, and travels extensively in the Southwest where she lives part-time. She also teaches NAS 200- Introduction to Native American Studies.

Website: http://depts.hre.wvu.edu/cmarkstrom/


Daniel W. McNeil, Ph.D.

NAS Program Committee
Professor of Psychology, Eberly Professor of Public Service
Clinical Professor, Department of Dental Practice and Rural Health

Dr. McNeil received the Claude Worthington Benedum Distinguished Scholar Award in 2014, recognizing his research on pain and anxiety.


Dr. Daniel W. McNeil

Contact Information:

West Virginia University
53 Campus Drive
PO Box 6040
Morgantown, WV 26506-6040

304/293-1712 (Telephone)
304/293-6606 (Facsimile)
Daniel.McNeil@mail.wvu.edu (E-mail)

website: www.as.wvu.edu/psyc/Faculty/DMcNeil/



Connie Pan, M.F.A.

Lecturer, Native American Studies
M.F.A. Candidate, Department of English
Eberly College of Arts and Sciences


Instructor Connie Pan

Contact Information:
Native American Studies Program
PO Box 6284
Morgantown, WV 26506-6284
304-293-4626



Ms. Pan has prepared the online course, “Culture of Hawaii,” to be taught in summer 2013. This is an introductory level three-credit class in Hawaiian culture that includes an initial overview of the society, beliefs, and practices from pre-contact period to present-day Hawaii. The course is intended to enhance knowledge of Hawaiian culture through the exploration of multi-media texts including, but not limited to art, music, literature, dance, food, tattoo, religion, land, language, and entertainment. Some fo the texts for the course may include: “The Descendants” (film), Unfamiliar Fishes by Sarah Vowell, and Hawaii’s Story by Hawaii’s Queen Liliuokalani. Connie Pan is an MFA Candidate from Maui, Hawaii and explores Hawaii and its issues in her writing.


Robert “Bob” Pirner

Lecturer, Native American Studies
Eberly College of Arts and Sciences



Robert Pirner

Contact Information:
facebook.com/iyokipi
Twitter is @BobPirner
Native American Studies Program
PO Box 6284
Morgantown, WV 26506-6284
Phone: 304-293-4626





Mr. Pirner teaches about the art, politics, history, religion, social problems, and culture of the Lakota people of the Northern Plains. He was a 30-year resident of the Rosebud Lakota Reservation in South Dakota and a tribal college administrator. He is one of an estimated 6,000 living speakers of the Lakota language, having learned it as a child in Spring Creek Community. He is a family man, small town guy, non-profit executive and mentor. In the words of his Lakota relatives, Ikche Wichasa he miye (just an average guy).

Courses Taught:
Lakota Studies
Lakota Wisdom: Lessons from the Elders and the Land
Native American Filmmakers
Powwow Studies
Akicita: Warrior Spirit, Courage, and Community
Introduction to Native American Studies
Working in Indian Country



Anna M. Schein

NAS Program Committee
University Librarian
Printed Ephemera Collection Curator, WV & Regional History Collection
Bibliographer, Native American & Indigenous Studies, Hispanic American Studies, TESOL, Linguistics


NAS


Contact Information:
2510 Wise Library
PO Box 6069
West Virginia University Libraries
Morgantown, WV 26506-6069
Anna.Schein@mail.wvu.edu
Tele: (304) 293-0348
Fax: (304) 293-3981



Darla Spencer, M.A., R.P.A.

Lecturer, Native American Studies
Eberly College of Arts and Sciences


Darla Spencer inspects a projectile point in preparation for cataloging

Contact Information:

Contact Information:
(304)561-4753
dispencer@suddenlink.net




Darla Spencer is a Registered Professional Archaeologist (RPA). She is Secretary/Treasurer of the West Virginia Archeological Society (WVAS), Vice President of the Council for West Virginia Archaeology, and a participant in the Native American History Council of West Virginia. She has given presentations throughout the state on the early history of Native Americans in the Ohio Valley as well as papers at archaeological conferences throughout the country. Darla has been published in the West Virginia Archeologist, the Quarterly Bulletin of the Archaeological Society of Virginia, and wrote several entries on West Virginia prehistory for the West Virginia Encyclopedia (2006). In 2003, she was awarded the Sigfus Olafson Award of Merit from the WVAS for contributions to the archaeology of West Virginia. Darla developed and taught Introduction to Mound Cultures in 2011 and is currently developing a class on the early Native peoples of what is now West Virginia for fall 2013.


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