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Why minor in Native American Studies?

WVU Native American Studies minors have applied their NAS education in a variety of successful professional roles, serving as educators, artists, researchers, interpreters at historical sites, engineers, legal consultants, in health care, and other meaningful careers. 

The Medicine Wheel

Medicine Wheel

The iconic NAS medicine wheel was designed by the late WVU Professor Emeritus Urban Couch (of Cherokee descent), a longstanding member of the NAS Committee.

The four points of the medicine wheel represent the cardinal directions and the four Great Powers of the wheel; the wheel represents universal harmony.

Professor Couch, former Chair of WVU’s Division of Art, was an award-winning visual artist, curator, and educator.

Many Native Americans describe Traveling the RED ROAD as choosing the good path for our journey through life.

Award-winning, esteemed Native leader William Gollnick will share his inspiring story in his April 10 WVU public lecture. What does it mean to strive to embody the worldview and best teachings of the ancestors, respecting important cultural traditions, caring for others, and making personal sacrifices, all while navigating the many challenges and conflicts of modern society? Elder-in-Residence William Gollnick’s lifetime of service will help us define the map of the Red Road.


William Gollnick with members of Tejon Tribe

William Gollnick, pictured with youth from the Tejon Indian Tribe

“It has been an awesome privilege and honor to work alongside Mr. Gollnick. From the time the Tejon Tribe gained federal re-affirmation in 2012, I can say that, with Creator’s grace, we secured the very best of men to assist us in the formative work of building our Nation. But the true honor for us is to have been treated as a relative by this great man. To be cared for, listened to, believed in, and loved by Mr. Gollnick is an immeasurable blessing that we continue to learn and grow from.” 

Sandra E. Hernandez, Treasurer,

Tejon Indian Tribe

 



William Gollnick, Onedia Nation leader

William Gollnick

(Oneida Nation of Wisconsin)

2019 Elder-in-Residence 


Join us for his Public Lecture:

Wed., April 10

6:30 pm

White Hall, room G09

6:00 pm Welcome Reception

Events Free & Open to the Public
Free parking after 6pm
in Mountainlair Garage, Upper Level

Many Native Americans describe Traveling the RED ROAD as choosing the good path for our journey through life.

Award-winning, esteemed Native leader William Gollnick will share his inspiring story in his April 10 WVU public lecture. What does it mean to strive to embody the worldview and best teachings of the ancestors, respecting important cultural traditions, caring for others, and making personal sacrifices, all while navigating the many challenges and conflicts of modern society? Elder-in-Residence William Gollnick’s lifetime of service will help us define the map of the Red Road.


Oneida Nation of Wisconsin logo

William Gollnick, 2019 WVU Native American Studies Elder-in-Residence, will meet with faculty, staff and students in Native American Studies, Leadership Studies, WVU Extension 4-H Youth Development,  & the College of Education & Human Services. He brings a wealth of life experiences and career successes to our campus: 

Tribal Administrator, Tejon Indian Tribe (assisting in Nation-Building efforts following tribal federal reaffirmation)

Chief of Staff, Oneida Tribe, supervised legislative affairs & communications, representing at national, state, & local levels

General Manager, Oneida Tribe, oversaw 1700 tribal nation government employees

Oneida Tribe Legislative Affairs Director, represented the Oneida in inter-governmental initiatives in Indian Country

Appointed by President George H. W. Bush as a Presidential Delegate to the White House Conference on Indian Education

Appointed by President Bill Clinton as a member of the National Advisory Council on Indian Education, to which he was elected Vice-Chairman

Alumnus of Harvard University Graduate School of Education: Administration, Planning, & Social Policy

US Marine Veteran, Vietnam Era

Board Member of Carlisle Indian Boarding School Project & Grandson of Carlisle Indian School student

William Gollnick with Tejon Tribe youth

“It has been an awesome privilege and honor to work alongside Mr. Gollnick. From the time the Tejon Tribe gained federal re-affirmation in 2012, I can say that, with Creator’s grace, we secured the very best of men to assist us in the formative work of building our Nation. But the true honor for us is to have been treated as a relative by this great man. To be cared for, listened to, believed in, and loved by Mr. Gollnick is an immeasurable blessing that we continue to learn and grow from.” 

Sandra E. Hernandez, Treasurer, Tejon Indian Tribe


"I had the pleasure of working with Bill in various capacities since 1974.  45 years ago, we began working together as he was the Director of the Oneida Language Program and I was an Oneida Language Teacher/Trainee.  He was an original part of the initiative to preserve, restore, and protect the Oneida Language. The Oneida Language thrives today and is taught in our schools and in our community.  Beyond the Oneida Language, Bill is one of the most versatile professionals ever to work for the Oneida Nation. His contributions to our culture, language and professionalism are reflected in our nation’s history of economic development, educational programs, and legislative affairs.  As a former General Manager, he has been a part of major organizational change and continual, strategically-planned operational development which has made the Oneida Nation a leader in Indian Country and model of Tribal government. I have considered Bill a very close and dear friend and mentor since we worked together 45 years ago.  He has been my supervisor as Language Program Director, General Manager and Chief of Staff for our council."

Bobbi Webster, Public Relations Director, Oneida Nation


"William (Bill) Gollnick is perhaps the most competent, elegant, amazing individual I've ever met. He's a very inclusive person who treats all people with equal respect--when he speaks, it is from the heart and he can captivate an entire audience. He's been a blessing in my life and I treasure our friendship, as well as the opportunity to work together on the Carlisle Indian School Project."

Sandra Cianciulli (Oglala Lakota), Carlisle Indian School Project Board Member


"I bring my students to Oneida each fall to help with the White Corn harvest.  People in the community will remark on my book (Seventh Generation Earth Ethics: Native Voices of Wisconsin) and mention how much they enjoyed Bill's chapter. Personally, I think Bill was part of the glue that held the nation together during some of its most vulnerable years.  How fortunate for the Oneida to have such a visionary in the 1970s, when things began to turn around."

Patty Loew, PhD (Bad River Band of Lake Superior Ojibwe), Director of the Center for Native American & Indigenous Research at Northwestern University


NOTE: Oneida Nation logo used with permission of Oneida Communications Office; Wm. Gollnick photo by Cassondra Trepanier



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